Monthly Archives: March 2015

When to Repair or Replace Your Roof + FREE Gutter Guards

Leaks, renovations, and old age: no matter what the motivation, there never seems to be a convenient time to deal with roofing issues. So how do you know when you should simply repair your roof or invest in a whole new one?

The first, and most important, factor is age. The lifespan of roofing materials vary widely, so it’s good to know what you’re dealing with first.

Asphalt: The most common shingles in roofing, these materials typically last 15 to 20 years. New, high-quality shingles sometimes claim a lifespan up to 40 years.

Wood: Made of western red cedar, cypress, pine and redwood trees, these shingles can last for 15 years or more, depending on the quality and the type of the wood.

Slate: They may be expensive, but slate roofs can last up to 100 years.

Concrete and Clay: These heavy materials are very durable and can last up to 200 years.

Metals: Metal roofs have long been used on commercial properties but are now also being used on contemporary residences, too. Metal roofs can last for centuries.

The second factor to consider is the type of issue you are having. Many roof leaks can be repaired for the short term without having to replace the entire roof. Leaks often occur when there are problems with the flashing, the thin, continuous pieces of sheet metal or other impervious material installed to prevent the passage of water into a structure from an angle or joint. You’ll usually see this when two parts of a roof join together, where the roof meets the chimney or where the roof meets a plumbing vent. If you’re finding that there is extensive damage from moisture to the roofing layer or any interior surfaces, you should probably consider a full replacement.

Another factor to consider is the shape of your shingles. If you’re missing a few shingles, or a handful are damaged, you can replace them. If more than 30 percent of your roof has torn, split, curled or missing shingles, it’s time to add a new roof. You’ll sometimes see this suddenly after a bad hailstorm.

Lastly, if your home recently survived a major catastrophe, such as a tornado or hurricane, you might very well need a new roof. You’ll usually damage beyond what you can usually see.

Your best bet is to call reputable roofing professional. They will do a thorough inspection and give you options of what you can do to repair your roof and compare those to the cost and benefits of total or partial replacement.

SPRING SPECIAL! Our back room is full of a bunch of extra gutter guard material. So with every new roof, we are giving away FREE gutter protection. The metal mesh is great for allowing rain to get in, but stopping pesky leafs, sticks, debris and rodents in their tracks. Call us for this special offer: (586) 777-6633. While supplies last.

From Kitchens to Baths: What You Need to Know About Tile Materials

Whether you’re re-doing your kitchen or your bathroom, chances are that tile is in your plans. There are a variety of tile types available. Choosing the best one depends on where you plan to put it and the amount of care you are willing to provide to keep it looking its best.

Stone

Natural stone tiles are commonly made from slate, granite, travertine, marble or limestone. The wide range of colors and textures make these tiles a popular choice in the home, especially in bathrooms because of the stone’s water absorption qualities.

• Benefits. Stone is durable and can withstand heavy use. Its natural look works well with a variety of décor styles, giving it a timeless quality. It’s especially well-suited to the bathroom because moisture doesn’t damage stone.

• Concerns. The primary concern with stone is staining. It isn’t often used in kitchens unless it is thoroughly sealed, because it can easily absorb grease and food stains. Stone is also one of the more expensive options, so it may not be suitable for large projects.

Glass

Few tile options give you more choices than glass. Glass tiles come in nearly every color imaginable. Frosted, textured, translucent, mirrored and opaque glasses are available in a variety of tile shapes and sizes.

• Benefits. The enhanced shine and reflective qualities of glass give a look of cleanliness and spaciousness to both the bathroom and kitchen. It works well on both the walls, as a backsplash, or as a flooring option. Glass is extremely durable, stain-resistant and easy to clean – water and a bit of glass cleaner is all you need. It works especially well in mosaics and a trim.

• Concerns. Glass can feel cold, so it may not be the best flooring option in a cool bathroom. It can also be slippery, so it’s often only used as an accent piece on a bathroom floor.

Ceramic

Ceramic tiles are becoming more common because of their versatility. Available in a range of colors and shapes, you can create almost any design with these durable tiles.

• Benefits. The tiles themselves are easy to clean and resist staining. You can also control the slip factor by choosing a ceramic finish that provides some slip resistance. Ceramic tiles are often used in kitchens, bathrooms, and as shower surrounds because of their durability.

• Concerns. Although the tiles are easy to clean, the grout lines are prone to staining and mildew. Sealing the grout can help prevent these issues, although they may requiring periodic resealing. When selecting ceramic tiles, quality matters. Low-quality tiles can be prone to chipping and cracking.

Stainless Steel, Copper and Metal

Metal tiles are becoming more popular due to their clean lines and easy maintenance. Durability and care requirements do vary depending on the type of metal chosen.

• Benefits. Most metal tiles can simply be wiped clean. Etching and tarnish can be an issue on some metals, like copper, so these are usually used in small applications, such as a kitchen backsplash. Constant moisture exposure can also cause the metal to age, so they are typically only used in kitchen applications.

• Concerns. Scratching and etching are the primary concerns with any metal tile. You can’t use abrasive cleaners and constant sweeping is necessary to prevent grit damage to metal floors. Metal is also cold, so it’s not the best option for a bathroom floor.

This post is brought to you by www.glasstileoasis.com. Benjamin Lamm is a communication specialist and blogger. Ben enjoys playing the guitar, spending time with family and social networking.