Category Archives: Basements

Why You Deserve a Home Remodel from Kopke

You’re ready and it’s time.  You’ve imagined relaxing in a spacious Jet tub and stepping out onto your heated tile floors.  You’ve imagined spice racks in the kitchen, and an organized pantry large enough to accommodate your Costco/Sams Club purchases.  Maybe an integrated beverage cooler separate from the refrigerator for an adult beverage and soft drinks!  You can picture your new space, have decided that now is the time, and the search has begun for the right remodeling company.

I’m sure you can imagine how great your home will look and feel after the remodel is complete, but it might be harder to imagine that the process will be free from headaches.  You’ve surely heard that the remodeling industry has a reputation for being nightmarish.  While taking on a large project inevitably has its challenges, we ask you to pass those headaches onto us.

At Kopke, we have 21 years and thousands of projects just like yours under our belts.  Let us manage your project, and we will roll out the red carpet. (Figuratively speaking of course, our tarps are cream in color.)  Remodeling your home should be more like a trip to the spa, not a trip to Cedar Point!  You are paying money to do something nice for yourself, don’t let the experience turn into daily worries and headaches.  It doesn’t have to be this way!

Through attention to all details, proper planning, re-measures, fluid communication, and the setting of realistic goals and timelines, we have the resources to provide a smooth-flowing, meticulously designed, planned, overseen and executed construction process.

At Kopke Remodeling & Design, we believe that remodeling your home should be an enjoyable experience!  You’ve saved up your hard-earned money and are ready to update your kitchen or bathroom, finish the basement, or add the addition or sunroom you’ve been dreaming about.

One of our many talents is designing spaces to suit individual needs, to make your life easier and more enjoyable. So why choose a company like Kopke Remodeling and Design? Because you deserve it!

Happy Customers Kathy and Tom Fuhrman in Shelby Township, with Kopke Designer Richard De Fauw

Basement Finishing: How Much Does it Cost?

Are you thinking about remodeling your basement space, but aren’t sure how much it will cost, how much value it will add to your home, and whether or not this is the right choice for you?  If so, I am writing this article just for you!

In the real estate world, basements (even walk-out basements) are not techincally allowed to be factored into the square footage of your home.

In the home pictured here, this is the case, even though the basement could be considered an entirely separate, 3,000 square foot apartment.

Basement remodels at Kopke range from $30-75 per square foot.  Add up the square footage of your basement (ignore the realtors, we all know finished basements “count”), and do a quick multiplication to figure out the range.  For example, a 1,000 square foot basement could cost $30,000 to $75,000 to finish, depending on the materials and layout selected.

Down the hall (and not pictured) is a large bedroom, a pool table room, a home gym, an office, a utility closet, a tool room, and a full bathroom with shower and walk-in tub.  To the left behind this wall is a storage room fit for an excessive collector / holiday enthusiast.

And what did it cost to finish this basement? $135,000.  At 3,000 square feet, this remodel came out on top of the price spectrum, at $45 per square foot.  This is because all top-of-the-line products were used, and very few items from the wishlist were overlooked.

I know what you are thinking: “Why spend $135,000 on a remodel that won’t add any value to my home?!!!??” That is where the debate comes in.  How can you deny the value of all the amenities I listed above?  And how about all the new friends you will make when people find out about the incredible bar in your basement?

All joking aside, every remodel increases the value of your home.  Each in a different way, relative to the wants and needs of the prospective buyer.  For example, if the buyer is handicapped, the walk-in-tub will be a tremendous value, and if the buyer is a chef, the wood-fired pizza oven* would fire him/her up, and the bathtub could be an unsightly nuisance.

If you plan to live in your home for a long time, update it to fit your lifestyle.  If you plan to sell soon, avoid trendy or niche products, and go towards something more universal. And I would say to be mindful of “technicalities”, but don’t get bogged down by them; each person has their own criteria for what is valuable.

Currently, we are finishing a basement in St. Clair Shores that is 1,000 square feet, and the price is about $27,000.  This one is at the bottom of the price spectrum, at $27 per square foot.  To keep costs low, we are salvaging as much as we can from the old basement to be reused, selecting “standard” products instead of “custom” as much as possible, all while still maintaining the Kopke standard for Quality.

To get started on turning your underused basement into extra living space, give us a call.  We can develop a customized plan to fit your needs, wishes and dreams!  www.kopkehome.com (586) 777-6633

*Unfortunately, the wood-fired pizza oven was one item on the wishlist that had to be forfeited.

Why Can’t I See an Itemized Price Breakdown?

“How to Buy Remodeling” Blog Series – Part Two

Why Can’t I See an Itemized Price Breakdown?

“Can you give me an itemized price for this project: materials and labor for cabinets, countertops, flooring?  I want to make sure what is included in what I’m buying.”  We get that question a lot when we’re talking to clients.  And the answer is no.  The explanation is this: when you buy a project, like a kitchen remodeling or a bathroom remodeling, you’re buying a compilation of several tasks that are integrated together.  And together they make a package and the package is the price.  If you asked me “how much is the drywall?”, the drywall is going to be more expensive then if you asked “how much is the drywall with a bath remodel?”.  So line-iteming is just going to scare you about the individual prices, and it’s just not going to make any sense.  For example, the drywall in the bathroom might be $600, and you can say “okay I’ll take the drywall”.  Well if you only want the drywall, its $1,000.  So asking for an individual price, while it might seem logical, does not make sense when you are buying a package.  You’re getting 3 or 4 quotes and the total project price is what you’re looking for.

If you think about it in terms of buying a car, you never ask “how much is the axle?” or “how much is the steering wheel?” Imagine how much work it would take for them to figure that out.  In the pricing department before it gets to the sales department, sure, they have figured out the price of everything and they put it together into the car and they add overhead and they add profit.  And then they end up with a selling price that is on a sticker on the window.  That car costs $30,000.  Well where that $30,000 is allocated really doesn’t matter.  How much of its profit? How much is material? How much is labor?  Doesn’t really matter.  So the only reason anyone would ever want any useful report showing itemized materials, labors, overheads, markups, profits, would be for some other reason other than to buy the package.  You’re not buying just part of the package.

Now as a company selling remodeling projects, we’re glad to show you the breakdown, in general, of the cabinets, the countertops, the flooring, but we can’t give you material lists, and labor lists, as we are estimating these costs.  It hasn’t been sold yet; we don’t even know the costs.  Once the job is sold, we are going to purchase everything and find out what everything actually costs.  We can’t go through and figure that out to the dollar on every quote.  We only sell 4 out of 10 that we talk to, and we are talking to 30 or 40 people a week that want to know what their project costs.  So we take an estimate of what it has cost in the past, add some mark up for overhead, and some mark up for profit, and that’s our estimate to the customer.  So the kitchen is going to be, let’s say, $26,000.  We don’t even know how much is labor and material!  The company has provided to the salesperson a guideline to figure out what the price is going to be depending on certain factors. But to break it all down is just going to take hours and hours and there is no justification for the time it would take to do it.  It also doesn’t make sense why someone would need that broken down.  So, we don’t do it.